Archive for the ‘chumby’ Category

Episode 3: A New Breed of Intellectual Property

Tuesday, June 21st, 2016

Episode 3 is out!

I say the darndest things on camera. O_o

Like everyone else, I see the videos when they are released. So far, this episode makes the clearest case for why Shenzhen is the up-and-coming place for hardware technology.

Most of the time my head is buried in resistors and capacitors. However, this video takes a wide-angle shot of the tech ecosystem. I’ve been visiting for over a decade, and this video is the first time I’ve seen some of the incredible things going on in Shenzhen, particularly in the corporate world.

Episode 2: Shenzhen and the Maker Movement

Wednesday, June 15th, 2016

Woooooo episode 2 is out!

I wrote a post once about getting my phone’s screen fixed in Shenzhen. I’ve learned a lot from watching these phone repair guys do their thing in Shenzhen.

This video shows most of the process, from splitting the bonded LCD/digitizer assembly using a cutting wire and a heated vacuum chuck, to rebonding, to removing bubbles in the LOCA (liquid optically clear adhesive) by way of a vacuum chamber. There’s also typically a UV curing step that was probably left out of the segment for time reasons. The whole video is a good watch, but if you’re short on time, the segment on repairing a screen starts at 12:36.

WIRED Documentary on Shenzhen

Wednesday, June 8th, 2016

WIRED is now running a multi-part video documentary on Shenzhen:

This shoot was a lot of fun, and it was a great pleasure working with Posy and Jim. I think their talent as producer and director really show through. They also did a great job editing my off-the-cuff narratives. The spot in the video where I’m pointing out Samsung parts isn’t matched to the b-roll of Apple parts, but in their defense I was moving so fast through the market that Jim couldn’t capture all the things I was pointing at.

I haven’t seen the whole documentary myself (I was just called in to give some tours of the market and answer a few questions in my hotel room), so I’m curious and excited to see where this is going! Especially because of the text chosen for printing during my Moore’s Law explanation at 3:13 — “ALL PROPRIETARY AND NO OPEN SOURCE MAKES INNOVATION A SLOW PROCESS.”

:)

Preparing for Production of The Essential Guide To Electronics in Shenzhen

Sunday, March 13th, 2016

The crowd funding campaign for The Essential Guide to Electronics in Shenzhen is about to wrap up in a couple of days.

I’ve already started the process of preparing the printing factory for production. Last week, I made another visit to the facility, to discuss production forecasts, lead time and review the latest iteration of the book’s prototype. It’s getting pretty close. I’m now using a heavy, laminated cardstock for the tabbed section dividers to improve their durability. The improved tabs pushes up the cost of the book, and more significantly, pushes the shipping weight of the book over 16 oz, which means I’m now paying a higher rate for postage. However, this is mostly offset by the higher print volume, so I can mitigate the unexpected extra costs.

The printing factory has a lot of mesmerizing machines running on the floor, like this automatic cover binder for perfect-bound books:

And this high speed two-color printing press:

This is probably the very press that the book will be printed on. The paper moves so fast that it’s just a blur as an animated gif. I estimate it does about 150 pages per minute, and each page is about a meter across, which gives it an effective throughput of over a thousand book-sized pages per minute. Even for a run of a couple thousand books, this machine would only print for about 15 minutes before it has to stop for a printing plate swap, an operation which takes a few minutes to complete. This explains why books don’t get really cheap until the volume reaches tens of thousands of copies.

Above is the holepunch used for building prototypes of ring-bound books. The production punch is done using a semi-automated high-volume die-cutter, but for the test prints, this is the machine used to punch out the holes.

The ring binding itself is done by a fairly simple machine. The video above shows the process used to adjust the machine’s height for a single shot on the prototype book. In a production scenario, there would be a few workers on the table to the left of the binding machine aligning pages, adding the covers, and inserting the ring stock. Contrast this to the fully automated perfect binding machine shown at the top of this post — ring binding is a much more expensive binding style in this factory, since they haven’t automated the process (yet).

I also got a chance to see the machine that gilds and debosses the book cover. It’s a bit of a different process than the edge-gilding I described in the previous post about designing the cover.

Here, an aluminum plate is first made with the deboss pattern. It looks pretty neat — I’ve half a mind to ask the laoban if he’d save the used plates for me to keep as a souvenir, although the last thing I need in my tiny flat in Singapore is more junk.

The plate is then glued into a huge press. This versatile machine can do debossing, die cutting, and gilding on sheets of paper as large as A0. For the gilding operation, the mounting face for the aluminum plate is heated to around 130 degrees Celsius.

I think it’s kind of cute how they put good luck seals all over the machines. The characters say “kai gong da ji” which literally translated means “start operation, big luck”. I don’t know what’s the underlying reason — maybe it’s to wish good luck on the machine, the factory, or the operator; or maybe fix its feng shui, or some kind of voodoo to keep the darned thing from breaking down again. I’ll have to remember to ask what’s the reason for the sticker next time I visit.

Once at temperature, the gilding foil is drawn over the plate, and the alignment of the plate is determined by doing a test shot onto a transparent plastic sheet. The blank cover is then slid under the sheet, taped in place, and the clear sheet removed.

The actual pressing step is very fast — so fast I didn’t have a chance to turn my camera into video mode, so I only have a series of three photos to show the before, pressing, and after states.

And here’s a photo of me with the factory laoban (boss), showing off the latest prototype. I’ve often said that if you can’t meet the laoban, the factory’s too big for you. Having a direct relationship with the laoban has been helpful for this project; he’s very patiently addressed all my strange customization requests, and as a side bonus he seems to know all the good restaurants in the area so the after-work meals are usually pretty delicious.

I’m looking forward to getting production started on the book, and getting all the pledge rewards delivered on-time. Now’s the last chance to back the crowd funding campaign and get the book at a discounted price. I will order some extra copies of the book, but it’s been hard to estimate demand, so there’s a risk the book could sell out soon after the campaign concludes.

The Story Behind the Cover for
The Essential Guide to Electronics in Shenzhen

Wednesday, February 24th, 2016

First, I want to say wow! I did not expect such a response to this book. When preparing for the crowdfunding campaign, I modeled several scenarios, and none of them predicted an outcome like this.

The Internet has provided fairly positive feedback on the cover of the book. I’m genuinely flattered that people like how it turned out. There’s actually an interesting story behind the origins of the book cover, which is the topic of this post.

It starts with part of a blog post series I did a while back, “The Factory Floor, Part 3 of 4: Industrial Design for Startups”. In that post, I outline a methodology for factory-aware design, and I applied these methods when designing my book cover. In particular, step 3 & 4 read:

3. Visit the facility, and take note of what is actually running down the production lines. … Practice makes perfect, and from the operators to the engineers they will do a better job of executing things they are doing on a daily basis than reaching deep and exercising an arcane capability.

4. Re-evaluate the design based on a new understanding of what’s possible, and iterate.

My original cover design was going to be fairly conventional – your typical cardboard laminated in four color printing, or perhaps even a soft cover, and the illustration was to be done by the same fellow who did the cute bunny pictures that preface each chapter, Miran Lipovača.

But, as a matter of practicing what I preach, I made a visit to the printing factory to see what was running down its lines. They had all manners of processes going on in the factory, from spine stitching to die cutting and lamination.


Chibitronics’ Circuit Sticker Sketchbook is also printed at this factory

One process in particular caught my eye – in the back, there was a room full of men using belt sanders with varying grits of sand paper to work the edges of books until they were silky smooth. Next to that was a hot foil transfer machine – through heat and pressure, it can apply a gold (or any other color) foil to the surface of paper. In this case, they were gilding the edges of books, in a style similar to that found on fancy bibles and prayer books. They could also use the same process to do a foil deboss on cardboard.


Beltsanding the edges of a stack of books until they are silky smooth


Closeup of the hot foil transfer mechanism


Stacks of books with gleaming, gilded edges

This is when I got the idea for the cover. These gilded books looked beautiful – and because the process is done in-house, I knew I could get it for a really good price. So, I went back to the drawing board and thought about what would look good using this process. The first idea was to take the bunny picture, and adapt it for the gold foil process. Unfortunately, the bunny illustrations relied heavily upon halftone grays, something which wouldn’t translate well into a gold foil process. Someone else suggested that perhaps I should do a map of China, with Shenzhen marked and some pictures of components around it. I didn’t like it for a number of reasons, the first one being the headache of securing the copyright to a decent map of China that was both geographically accurate and politically correct.

So I did a Google image search for “gold leaf covers” just to see what’s out there. The typical motif I observed was some kind of filigree, typically with at least left/right symmetry, if not also up/down symmetry.

I thought maybe I’d go and fire up Adobe Illustrator and start sketching some filigree patterns, but quickly gave up on that idea – it was a lot of work, and I’m not entirely comfortable with that tool. Then it hit upon me that individual PCB layers have the same sort of intricacy as a filligree – and I live and breathe PCB design.

So, I started up my favorite PCB design package, Altium. I tried playing around a bit with the polygon fill function, using its hashing feature and adjusting the design rules to see if I couldn’t make a decent filigree with it. The effect seemed reasonable, especially when I used a fairly coarse fill and an additional design rule that caused polygon fills to keep a wide berth around any traces.

Then I had to come up with some circuitry to fill the cover. I looked at a few of my circuit boards, and in reality, few practical circuits had the extreme level of symmetry I was looking for. So I went ahead and cocked up a fake circuit on the fly. I made a QFN footprint based on fictional design rules that would look good, and sorted through my library of connector footprints for ones that had large enough pads to print reasonably well using the foil transfer process. I found a 2.4GHz antenna and some large-ish connectors.

I then decided upon a theme – generally, I wanted the book to go from RF on the bottom to digital on the top. So I started by drawing the outline of an A5 page, and putting a couple lines of symmetry down. In the lower left, I placed the 2.4 GHz antenna, and then coupled it to a QFN in a semi-realistic fashion, throwing a couple of capacitors in for effect. I added an SMA connector that spanned the central symmetry line, and then an HRS DF-11 connector footprint above it. I decided in the RF section I’d make extensive use of arcs in the routing, calling upon a motif quite common in RF design and visually distinct from digital routing. Next I added a SATA connector off to the middle edge, and routed a set of differential pairs to the TX/RX pads, to which I applied the trace length equalization feature of the PCB tool to make them wavy – just for added aesthetic effect.

Then I started from the top left and designed the digital section. Nothing says “old school digital” to me louder than a DB-9 connector (and yes, you pedants, it’s technically a DE-9, but in my heart it will always be a DB-9), so I plopped one of those down up top. I decided I’d spice things up a bit by throwing series termination resistors between the connector and a fake QFN IC; yes, in reality, not all pins would have these, but I thought it looked more aesthetic to put it on all the pins. Then, I routed signals from the QFN as a bus, this time using 45 degree angles, to a 14-pin JTAG connector which I placed in the heart of the book. Everything starts and ends with the JTAG connector these days, so why not?

The design now occupied just the left half of the board. I copied it, flipped it, and pasted it to create a perfect 2-fold symmetry around the vertical axis.

Around all of this, I put a border with fiducials and gutters, the same as you would find in a PCB destined for production in an automated SMT line. You’ll notice I break symmetry by making the top right fiducial a square, not a circle; this is a hallmark feature of fiducials, since their purpose is to both align the vision recognition systems and determine if the PCB has been loaded into the machine correctly.

Finally, I added the book title and author using Altium’s TrueType string facility, and ran an automated fill of the empty space to create the filigree.

I actually designed the whole cover while I was on the long flight from Hong Kong to Amsterdam for 32C3. I find that airplane flights are excellent for doing PCB routing and design work like this, free of any distractions from the Internet. As a bonus, every now and then someone comes along and feeds you and tops up your glass of wine, allowing your creative streak to be unbroken by concerns about hunger or sobriety.

When viewed in black and white, the book cover honestly looks a little “meh” – when I first saw it, I was thought, “well, at least maybe the geeks will appreciate it”. But after seeing the faux-linen with gold foil transfer sample, I knew this was the design I would run with for production.

The next difficult challenge was to not paint legs on the metaphorical snake. As an engineer, I disliked how over-simplified the design was. There really should be bypass capacitors around the digital components. And SATA requires series DC blocking caps. But I had to let all that go, set it aside, and stop looking at it as a design, and let it live its own life as the cover of a book.

And so there you have it – the story behind perhaps the only book cover designed using Altium (if you have a gerber viewer, you can check out the gerber files). The design went from a .PcbDoc file, to a .DXF, to .AI, and finally placed in a .INDD – not your typical progression of file formats, but in the end, it was fun and worthwhile figuring it all out.

Thanks again to everyone who helped promote and fund my book. I’m really excited to get started on the print run. The problem I’m facing now is I don’t know how many to print. Originally, I was fairly certain no matter what, I would just barely hit the minimum order quantity (MOQ) of 1,000 books. Now that the campaign has blown past that, I have to wait until the campaign finishes in 23 days before I know what to put on the purchase order to the manufacturer. And, shameless plug – if you’re interested in the book, it’s $5 cheaper if you back during the campaign, so consider getting your order in before the prices go up.